3d bitmap letters

IMG_0055
the finished product

I made a 3d bitmap word for my dad for his birthday. This will show you how to make your own. The process isn’t difficult but there are a few things you can do to make it easier.

Planning

IMG_0054First, choose a word you want to make a 3d bitmap version of. Write it out the way you would like it to appear, using a big fat marker (of a color you can easily see through) on graph paper. Use a pencil to fill in the squares which will actually become the boxes. Count the squares; this is how many cubes you will need to create. Add squares here and there if you think there might be areas which will end up being not that sturdy.

This is all quicker than using a graphic program to make a bitmapped word.

Set-up

Now that you know how many cubes to cut out, decide how big you want the finished product to be. Here is a cube template you should easily be able to resize to whatever you want. Keep in mind that only using 3 letters and a 1 inch cube my finished product was 34 inches wide.

Construction

I found it easiest to glue up columns first, then glue the columns together.

Gluing the columns together first allows a little dry time which makes the columns a little more sturdy when pressing into the rest of the sculpture.

The Finished Product

IMG_0056
3-d bitmapped word

You may want to glue the finished product to a board. When I presented mine, I snuck it into my parents’ house and put this on the dining room table for extra wow effect.

4312 davron ln 37918

In order to help sell my old house, I whipped up a little WP site full of photos of the place. I’m not really sure exactly why, but I made a QR code drawing / painting which linked to the site. The house was sold before I completed this piece, and the code links to a domain that is now pointless to maintain. So, now the link will point to, you guessed it, right here. Until the domain expires. But, the finished piece is still pretty cool to look at. (Part of the lesson learned from this experiment is to link just to a site I plan on maintaining, like this one.)

method

First I drew the grid on watercolor paper. I painted the ‘black’ squares in a checkerboard pattern of blue and green. Next, I masked off squares about an eighth inch smaller than the grid cells and painted the ‘white’ squares yellow. After this, I still needed more contrast, so I drew alternating diagonal lines on top of the blue and green.

This artwork is also in my scraps collection on DA.

adam rowe dot com QR code painting

What, you didn’t think it would work…?

This gallery contains full and detail views of a QR code pointing to this site. This was one of my first successful QR code paintings. After getting the code, I used a Sharpie to draw alternating diagonal lines where the dark squares should be. The remaining light squares were painted orange with acrylic paint. This alone wasn’t high enough contrast, so I added purple tissue paper squares over the purple stripes and white paint over the orange squares.

Take a picture of the screen to see it in action. See you in a minute.

recursive antecedent quick response code experiment 2013-06-02

If it’s not obvious, this is a time lapse video of me constructing a QR code which links to a video of me constructing a QR code which links to a video of me constructing a QR code which links to a video of… you get the idea.

resources

To photograph, I used a Nikon D200 and a timer. The photos were then dumped in Windows Live Movie Maker and the video was uploaded to Vimeo. Here is my favorite QR code generator.

the carnival of the animals puppets

These puppets are some of the creatures featured in The Carnival of the Animals by Camille Saint-Saëns. They are rod puppets which double as shadow puppets, and are made with pieces of recycled magazines and cardboard.